Protest and punishment: How thousands of demonstrators are set to face Hong Kong’s court system

With the onset of the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, fewer people are taking to the streets in Hong Kong – but for prosecuted protesters, the work is just getting started. By the end of January 2020, over 7,000 people had been arrested in connection with the protests, about 1,000 charged, and 20 sentenced. Common charges are criminal damage, possession of an offensive weapon, assaulting the police, obstructing the police, participating in an unlawful assembly, and participating in a riot.

Does Hong Kong’s annual July 1 democracy march violate the law? An analysis and rebuttal

July 1 – the day which marks Hong Kong’s handover to China. July 1 – the day known for its celebratory fireworks display, but more importantly, for its symbolic annual march.

In the two decades since the establishment of the Special Administrative Region, the march has become synonymous with political discontent, serving as a platform for the public and pro-democracy activists to lobby for genuine democracy and universal suffrage. In 2003, 500,000 demonstrators joined the march, forcing the government into an embarrassing climb-down on its proposed national security law.

旺角騷亂案陪審團被偷拍

法政匯思發言人何旳匡大律師表示,梁天琦一案的陪審團未必會受偷拍影響,畢竟他們於裁決時尚未知悉司法機構收到電郵;但日後重審時,就可能會有影響,屆時的陪審團可能會憂慮被認出身分。何亦表示,無論偷拍是否無心之失、是否有影響審訊公正的意圖,偷拍已經犯法,如在下次重審時,再有偷拍,應該起碼登記該人身分資料,不應輕易放過。