Hong Kong’s leaderless protest movement put to the test with arrest of prominent activists

The protests that have convulsed this city for nearly three months have lacked any clear leadership in a bid to sustain momentum should any of their organizers be threatened with jail.

Xinjiang and Hong Kong: the periphery playbook

Speaking at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents’ Club on 14 August 2018, shortly before his political party was banned, Hong Kong National Party (HKNP) spokesperson Andy Chan pointedly drew parallels between developments in Hong Kong and those in East Turkestan [Xinjiang] and Tibet. That comparison smacks of hyperbole. As the UK’s Foreign & Commonwealth Office noted in its latest six-monthly report on Hong Kong, the territory “continues to be a prosperous and vibrant city” – a world away from the concentration camps of Xinjiang. Nor is Chan – who previously declared armed insurrection a possible way forward for his party – a particularly compelling advocate.

Hong Kong journalists’ club in free speech dispute

A fringe pro-independence party and a historic journalists’ club have been thrust into the forefront of the intensifying battle over free speech and the rule of law in Hong Kong, a semi- autonomous Chinese territory that has long prided itself on its civic freedoms.

Hong Kong government tries to make an example of a small opposition party

A tiny and previously little-known political party with no presence in the legislature would have languished on the fringes of Hong Kong’s political sphere were it not for attempts by the city’s government to crush the group.

Now, the Hong Kong National Party finds itself in the limelight, raised to an unaccustomed level of prominence in a dispute that is fast becoming a test for the city’s autonomy.

Hong Kong Radical Is Test Case in China’s Bid to Limit Speech

Earlier this month, Hong Kong’s government threatened to ban Chan’s pro-independence National Party, a move unprecedented since the city’s return to Chinese rule in 1997. Andy Chan talked about China's plan to limit speech.

你會用結社言論自由的古董花樽去打香港民族黨這隻昆蟲嗎?

有很多人會說他不支持港獨,不認同香港民族黨的主張,政府打壓港獨團體有什麼問題,主張港獨不就是把國家搞分裂嗎?這基於維護國家安全為目的,做法似乎很合理,保安局局長李家超口口聲聲地說香港是法治的社會,他的決定是根據社團條例作出的,那麼不就是依法治港嗎?

Explainer: How Hong Kong is seeking to ban a pro-independence party using existing national security laws

In their recommendation to ban the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party (HKNP) on Tuesday, the legal grounding cited by the police was the Societies Ordinance. They told the government that there was a sufficiently strong case in the interests of “national security, public safety, public order, protection of freedom and rights of others” for the security secretary to ban the embattled group.