Hong Kong journalists’ club in free speech dispute

A fringe pro-independence party and a historic journalists’ club have been thrust into the forefront of the intensifying battle over free speech and the rule of law in Hong Kong, a semi- autonomous Chinese territory that has long prided itself on its civic freedoms.

Hong Kong government tries to make an example of a small opposition party

A tiny and previously little-known political party with no presence in the legislature would have languished on the fringes of Hong Kong’s political sphere were it not for attempts by the city’s government to crush the group. Now, the Hong Kong National Party finds itself in the limelight, raised to an unaccustomed level of prominence in a dispute that is fast becoming a test for the city’s autonomy.

Hong Kong Radical Is Test Case in China’s Bid to Limit Speech

Earlier this month, Hong Kong’s government threatened to ban Chan’s pro-independence National Party, a move unprecedented since the city’s return to Chinese rule in 1997. Andy Chan talked about China's plan to limit speech.

你會用結社言論自由的古董花樽去打香港民族黨這隻昆蟲嗎?

有很多人會說他不支持港獨,不認同香港民族黨的主張,政府打壓港獨團體有什麼問題,主張港獨不就是把國家搞分裂嗎?這基於維護國家安全為目的,做法似乎很合理,保安局局長李家超口口聲聲地說香港是法治的社會,他的決定是根據社團條例作出的,那麼不就是依法治港嗎?

Petition slams ‘abuse’ of freedom of association

More than 60 groups signed a petition criticizing the government's abuse of freedom of association by proposing to ban the Hong Kong National Party. Assistant Societies Officer Rebecca Lam Hiu-tung, who is also assistant police commissioner, had recommended that Secretary for Security John Lee Ka-chiu prohibit the pro-independence party from continuing to operate.

Explainer: How Hong Kong is seeking to ban a pro-independence party using existing national security laws

In their recommendation to ban the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party (HKNP) on Tuesday, the legal grounding cited by the police was the Societies Ordinance. They told the government that there was a sufficiently strong case in the interests of “national security, public safety, public order, protection of freedom and rights of others” for the security secretary to ban the embattled group.

Police monitored pro-independence Hong Kong National Party for 18 months before attempt to ban it

Liberal lawyers’ group voices concern over attempt to shut down party on national security grounds, when it has not resorted to violence

An all-out war of words: Where does free speech start and end in Hong Kong?

Progressive Lawyer Group member Jason Y. Ng talks about the free speech controversies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong 香港中文大學 - CUHK and The Education University of Hong Kong, in an op-ed for the Hong Kong Free Press HKFP (views are his own). "Activists fighting for marriage equality or access to medical marijuana should be free to wave rainbow flags or hand out leaflets explaining the health benefits of cannabis. Neither same-sex marriage nor marijuana use is legally permissible, but that’s precisely the point of free speech: to debate whether they should be."

中大再現港獨橫額 校方斥違法

中大文化廣場昨再現「香港獨立」的橫額和單張,校方斥港獨言論「違反香港有關法律」及有違校方立場,表明會清拆。傍晚約20名學生收到消息後聚集廣場守護橫額。學生會斥校方以權欺壓學生,會視乎情況考慮下一步行動。

Free speech row as CUHK warns against pro-independence banners

Banners calling for Hong Kong independence reappeared in the campus of the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) on Tuesday, prompting the university authorities to issue a warning. Kevin Yam Kin-fung, founder of the Progressive Lawyers Group, said the flyers and posters had merely discussed the issues and did not insinuate or encourage others to harm the regime. Hence, no law was broken, he argued.