Hong Kong Protesters Take Stock as Police Announce More Arrests

HONG KONG — Hong Kong’s protesters tried on Wednesday to maintain a united front and take stock of the movement’s gains and losses, as the police said they had arrested 12 people involved in clashes near the city’s legislature Monday.

Dân Hong Kong biểu tình – Giới trí thức nghĩ gì, làm gì?

Hai tuần sau đỉnh điểm cuộc biểu tình thu hút 2 triệu người hôm 16/6, dân Hong Kong lại đang rầm rộ xuống đường vì những đòi hỏi của họ vẫn chưa được chính quyền thân Bắc Kinh của Hong Kong đáp ứng.

Hong Kong: Protestors circle justice secretary building

Fresh protests mount pressure on Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam Hundreds of demonstrators surrounded on Thursday the office of Hong Kong’s justice official, demanding local authorities to release arrested protesters and complete withdrawal of controversial extradition bill. More than 200 demonstrators gathered early in the morning at Hong Kong’s Secretary of Justice Teresa Cheng’s … Continue reading Hong Kong: Protestors circle justice secretary building

Hong Kong police quit posts at two city hospitals after complaining they were verbally abused over extradition bill arrests

Barrister Chris Ng Chung-luen, who also signed the petition, said the police misunderstood their power. He said the privacy exemption cited by the association was not exercised by the officers themselves, but by the hospitals. That means if hospital staff decline to pass on patients’ information to officers, police cannot force them to do so.

China’s U-turn on Hong Kong extradition Bill expected to have a price

“They want to get this over with before the summit actually begins,” said Jason Y Ng, convener of the Hong Kong-based Progressive Lawyers Group. However, he said, the extradition Bill saga would not have gone down well on mainland China, and Beijing would likely take action in response.

Hong Kong Marchers Flood Streets Over Extradition Bill

HONG KONG—Protesters poured into this city’s streets for a second Sunday despite the suspension of a controversial bill to expand the government’s extradition powers, as a week of demonstrations appeared to be spiraling into a broader political movement.

Hongkong : l’exécutif annonce la « suspension » du projet de loi controversé

LA CHEFFE DE L’EXÉCUTIF HONGKONGAIS A SUSPENDU SON PROJET DE LOI VISANT À AUTORISER LES EXTRADITIONS VERS LA CHINE, SANS PARVENIR À FAIRE ANNULER UNE NOUVELLE MANIFESTATION PRÉVUE DIMANCHE.

Hong Kong leader halts extradition bill but opponents vow fresh rally

Hong Kong (AFP) - Hong Kong's embattled leader on Saturday suspended a hugely divisive bill that would allow extraditions to China, in a major climbdown following unprecedented unrest, but protesters vowed to press ahead with a mass Sunday rally.

Hong Kong has pulled off an amazing win against a dire threat to its freedoms

The odds were long but the million people who turned out last Sunday—and the tens of thousands who circled government offices—did it. Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam today (June 15) changed course, saying she had decided to indefinitely suspend a controversial bill that would have made it possible to extradite people from the city to China’s mainland to face trial.

Hong Kong’s digital battle: tech that helped protesters now used against them

In early June, Ivan Ip, 22, joined a public chat group on Telegram called “Parade 69”, named for a mass demonstration planned in central Hong Kong to protest a bill allowing for the transfer of suspects from the city to China. According to Ip, an administrator of the group of more than 30,000 people, they discussed things like bringing sunscreen, water, and umbrellas to block the sun or rain.

Why Hong Kong protesters are outraged by extradition bill

On June 9, 2019, organizers say that more than 1 million protesters in Hong Kong -- which would be nearly one in seven people in the city -- voiced their opposition to an extradition bill that would allow fugitives to be transferred to mainland China. Speaking to the Hong Kong Free Press, demonstrator and retired civil servant HK Lau said that the passage of the bill would mean the end of the "One Country, Two Systems" principle under which the city had been governed since the resumption of Chinese rule in 1997.

Hong Kong protests: “These protesters see China as a bulldozer”

Hong Kong protests: "These protesters see China as a bulldozer"

Everything you need to know about Hong Kong’s extradition law

Thousands of people amassed around Hong Kong’s government complex on Wednesday (June 12), scaling barriers and blocking a main road in scenes reminiscent of the city’s 2014 pro-democracy protests as lawmakers prepared to debate a controversial overhaul of the city’s extradition law that would make it possible to send suspects to mainland China for trial.

Hong Kong ‘Not Ready To Give Up’: Historic Protest Against Extradition Bill

Hong Kong people took to the streets on Sunday in mass protests to demonstrate against a proposed extradition bill that critics say could force dissidents to stand trial in the mainland — and which ultimately threatens the city’s judicial autonomy.

Massive Crowds Take to Streets in ‘Last Fight’ for Hong Kong

HONG KONG—Demonstrators staged the biggest rally challenging China’s authority over the city since Britain ceded control in 1997, marching through streets for hours to protest a proposed law that would let Beijing take people across the border to stand trial in the mainland.

Hong Kong’s end game: Why the extradition bill is an ‘infinity stone’ that could decimate half of society

In the past few weeks, Chief Executive Carrie Lam has been behaving a lot like Thanos. Our own super villain is hellbent on passing an amendment bill by the end of June to forge a new extradition arrangement between Hong Kong and mainland China. She justifies her game plan under the pretext of plugging a loophole in cross-border law enforcement, all to save Hong Kong from becoming a “haven for international fugitives.”

Fearing China’s Rule, Hong Kong Residents Resist Extradition Plan

NG KONG — Politicians have staged sit-ins and exchanged blows in the legislature. Nurses, high school teachers and even anime fans have organized petitions. And the authorities are bracing for protests on Sunday that could be the largest since the pro-democracy Umbrella Movement shut down parts of Hong Kong five years ago.