Why Hong Kong protesters are outraged by extradition bill

On June 9, 2019, organizers say that more than 1 million protesters in Hong Kong -- which would be nearly one in seven people in the city -- voiced their opposition to an extradition bill that would allow fugitives to be transferred to mainland China. Speaking to the Hong Kong Free Press, demonstrator and retired civil servant HK Lau said that the passage of the bill would mean the end of the "One Country, Two Systems" principle under which the city had been governed since the resumption of Chinese rule in 1997.

【逃犯條例】內地可促港府凍疑犯資產 律政前高官:表證成立即可

港府全力硬推修訂《逃犯條例》,激發社會極大矛盾,各界關注修例草案人權保障不足,而港府同時力推的《刑事事宜相互法律協助條例》(下稱《刑事互助條例》)修訂,雖然關注較前者小,但對港人亦有深遠影響。

Hong Kong protests: “These protesters see China as a bulldozer”

Hong Kong protests: "These protesters see China as a bulldozer"

Hong Kong’s identity as a city of rights and freedom is under threat – so we protest

Again, as in 2014, today’s protesters were primarily youths, clad in black t-shirts and chanting “Cit Wui!” (“Withdraw!”). Drawing on their experience from the Umbrella Movement, protesters quickly equipped themselves with protective gear – face masks, goggles, hard-hats – in anticipation of police batons, capsicum spray, or even tear gas and rubber bullets. Police formed three-deep defensive lines equipped with riot shields, truncheons and guns. By mid-morning, protester supply stations – well-stocked with water, foodstuffs, first-aid supplies and other necessities – were already springing up.